Protected: Are the DUP fascist?

Fascism is somewhat subjective – many definitions to many people. A story has run today in the Belfast Telegraph where an Alliance Councillor has received criticism for drawing a link between the Democratic Unionist Party and fascism. Is it valid? The Councillor, David Armitage, referred to the following list: So, let’s take them one by one. Powerful and Continuing Nationalism Nationalism is, by one definition, the sense and feeling that ones loyalty to the concept and identity of one’s nation is more important than all else. One example of this might be, “Deutschland, Deutschland über alles,” – one example might be the kind of national insularism that fights back against perceived foreign influence (European Union?) or the influx of people who don’t automatically have the same sense of national belonging (refugees and migrants?). Another might be the “NEVER, NEVER, NEVER” response to Ireland’s claim on Northern Ireland. Never? Really, never? What if the UK is actually democratically led by Muslim extremists, reversing Article 50, cutting the Northern Irish block grant to £7.50 per year, and making it illegal for education here. STILL the United Kingdom is the best place for Northern Ireland? That sense of nationalism, of Britain First, is, among the DUP a very powerful and very continuing nationalism. Disdain for Human Rights Have the DUP ever displayed disdain for human rights? The Universal Declaration of Human Rights lists the following articles: The Right to Equality Freedom from Discrimination Right to Equality before the Law Freedom to Arbitrary Arrest and Exile Right to Fair Public Hearing Right to be Considered Innocent until proven Guilty Right to Free Movement In and Out...

Sinn Féin have been barking up this tree before. And caved before too

Many commentators have been quick to make the point that Sinn Féin are hanging their hat (and the future of the devolved Northern Ireland institutions…) on getting agreement to implement an Irish Language Act, but yet no such red line was drawn in previous post-election talks. Not so. This Belfast Telegraph article from the late Liam Clarke highlights what has transpired previously. This was written 2 weeks before the Stormont House Agreement was signed. Sinn Fein has set out a list of demands – ranging from millions of pounds in Stormont funding to an Irish Language Act – it wants to see movement on before signing off on any deal on welfare reform and the budget. Conor Murphy MLA (then an MP), said: It (the government) has failed to implement commitments such as Acht na Gaeilge (an Irish Language Act), the Civic Forum, an all-island Consultative Forum, North South implementation bodies and a Bill of Rights…The British Government has also refused to address its role and responsibilities in dealing with the legacy of the past. One observation I would make here is that in 2014, Conor Murphy seemed to accept, from the above language, that the responsibility for an Irish Language Act lay with Westminster and not at the door of the DUP. Following Sinn Féin laying out their stall in 2014 (as they have once again…), the DUP’s Gregory Campbell MP infamously said that the DUP would treat Sinn Féin’s entire wish list as “no more than toilet paper.” As it transpired, Sinn Féin signed up to the Stormont House Agreement with no guarantee on an Irish Language Act –...